We continue our sermon series on the Life of King David, a man after God’s own heart. Today, we take
a look at an amazing woman named Abigail.

The story of Abigail and her crazy husband, Nabal reminds me of a story about a minister who was
losing his congregation to sleep during a dry sermon.

To revive those napping in the pew he said, “I livedWith a woman for over 17 years who was (story)

This sermon is about a marriage gone awry. It’s about an incredibly gracious woman named Abigail who
was married to a fool named Nabal.

His name literally means fool. He is a stubborn and arrogant man. Have you ever met anyone like that?
Nabal and Abigail remind me of a husband and wife who were on vacation and got lost and had a fierce
argument.

After driving several hours with neither one of them speaking they passed a mule in a field and the
husband looked at his wife and said, “Is that mule a relative of yours?”

His wife said, “Yes, by marriage!” Nabal was a mule headed man who was mean and very rich.
Abigail was just the opposite, a woman full of grace and understanding.

This story is the equivalent of the Beauty and the Beast. Getting married is the easy part, it’s living
together that can be a challenge.

In Biblical times, a woman had very little choice as to whom she would marry. Her marriage was arranged
by her parents and she had less to say if the man was wealthy like Nabal.

But Nabal was also evil in his dealings in business and at home. Abigail could not be more different
from her husband. Their marriage is a study in contrasts. His name means fool and her name means
source of joy.

She is described as a woman of beauty, intelligence and elegance. And like a good Presbyterian woman,
she is not ruled by her emotions but balanced, prudent and smart as a whip.

Here’s the story line. It was sheep shearing time in the Land of Israel (Explain to As you know, God sends)

As you know, God sends people our way to teach us lessons in our journey. For David, Abigail becomes
a priceless intermediary.

Abigail’s example involves 3 lessons about her leadership, wisdom and influence. First, Abigail
demonstrates resourcefulness.

The situation demanded an immediate response. If she didn’t act quickly, her friends, family and
employees would be wiped out.

Now, remember there were 400 men with David and 200 left behind. But here is what she did. She
knew they were hungry. (Explain to Friends how)

Friends, how is God using your resources to make a difference here in Key West? Second, Abigail
demonstrated a spirit of servitude.

She sacrificed her pride and literally fell on her face before David. She came in total humility to save her
wicked husband and his men.

Abigail was a true servant. She did what she had to do to save lives. But as you know, servants do that willingly
and graciously. A true servant doesn’t pass it on to someone else.

A true servant rises up to the occasion and takes care of all the little details to make it happen. And we often
fail to appreciate a true servant until they’re gone.

Many years ago in an old Austrian village along the(Story)

This story carries a relevant analogy to the times in which we live. What the keeper of the spring meant to
the village, Christian servants mean to our church and world.

Without servants here to prepare communion, serve on committees, clean up on spring cleaning day and do
Whatever needs to be done our church would lose its salt and light.

And finally, Abigail demonstrates tremendous faith. What a remarkable woman! Her one act saved David
from making an irreversible mistake, the killing of an innocent village.

The scriptures tell us that David listened to her and said, “blessed be your wisdom and blessed are you
from keeping me avenging myself!”

Later that evening, Abigail’s husband began to party into the night and the next day he had a massive
stroke and died.

David would go and live with Abigail for at least the next 17 years and yes, she was his wife. I admire
Abigail, perhaps one of the greatest women in the Bible. She stands out as a wonderful example of a
woman with grace, style and leadership.

Friends, there is a very important point to make in this story of Abigail. When you find yourself at an
impasse with a spouse, a family member, a friend, a co-worker, even an enemy.

Follow Abigail’s example and take some wine or grape juice, no better make that wine and a wonderful
dinner and sit down together and allow the spirit of fellowship and good will break through that impasse.

There is nothing like sitting down together and breaking bread that will alter a broken heart or hurting soul.

Jesus did it 2000 years ago at the Last Supper. And if it was good enough for Jesus and good enough for
Abigail and David, it’s good enough for me. Amen